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Southeast Asian Typhoon Haiyan Devastates NYC's "Little Manila"

Southeast Asian Typhoon Haiyan Devastates NYC's "Little Manila"
Filipino New Yorkers search for answers, missing family members in the Philippines

In the heart of Queens' Little Manila lies a string of bustling Filipino restaurants that cater to the many local Filipinos in the area.

But at one restaurant in particular, partrons are silent. They have hardly touched their food. All eyes are on the multiple televisions that broadcast the names of typhoon survivors. They are searching for friends and family back home.

Grace Marcos says she still hasn't heard from her five brothers and sisters who live in the Filipino province of Sabo. She can't help but worry for their safety. 

"I have been checking the news since yesterday and I have not seen their names," she said. "So I am still hoping that they are OK."

Willie Callanta grew up in the Philippines. He says he wouldn't be able to recognize his homeland after the storm. 

 "Based on what I heard and saw on the television it was like an atomic bomb was dropped," he said.

President Benigno Aquino of the Philippines has said the official death toll of the storm will be more than 2,000. According to the nation's Department of Foreign Affairs, 23 countries have offered humanitarian assistance to typhoon victims.