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Fordham Conversations

Fordham Conversations: The Secrets Behind Christmas Traditions

Why do we exchange presents? What's the history behind Christmas folklore?

On this week’s show, Fordham Professor Maureen Tilley tells us all about Christmas traditions and the stories behind them, some you may know and some you may not. From the horrifying folkloric Krampus to the reason we celebrate on December 25, why we exchange presents, and why Santa lives in the North Pole. Dr. Tilley is a professor of theology and medieval studies. 

Fordham Conversations: Privacy Education

In an age where status updates and tweets are connected to a person's identity, how can we teach the youth about maintaining their privacy?

Arguably the Internet is one of the greatest tools for communication and it gives the user the ability to communicate and connect with others. But there’s also a downside to being that “connected,” especially for kids who may not be aware of how their Internet activity is going to affect them in the future.

Fordham Conversations: Strike a Chord for Food Pantries and Soup Kitchens

For WFUV's Strike a Chord, Fordham Conversations explores the growing need for food pantries and soup kitchens.

For people who feel like their income can't support their nutrition, food pantries and soup kitchens can shoulder the weight free of charge. That "free" comes at a heavy cost, with some of these pantries and kitchens requiring upwards of millions to operate annually. As part of WFUV’s Strike a Chord campaign, this week's Fordham Conversations looks at the growing need for food pantries and soup kitchens.

Fordham Conversations: The Accidental Playground

Brooklyn residents “made their own environment” in an abandoned rail yard.

Today on Fordham Conversations we’ll talk to Daniel Campo, author of The Accidental Playground out now from Fordham University Press. It’s about what happened when Brooklyn residents gathered at the Brooklyn Waterfront, which was then an unofficial, do-it-yourself park. He talks about how the "unpark" was used in the late 90s and early 2000s and how it's changed since state officials got involved. 

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